More than a home, an experience
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About

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 top of the house sunrise

top of the house sunrise

 front door of the Carriage House

front door of the Carriage House

About Us

OP2018-00195: Fifteen Church St. B&B "Fifteen Church" is only a two minute walk from the tip of the peninsula, and a ten minute walk to restaurants. Tucked away on a quiet residential street in the historic South of Broad  ("SOB" as locals joke) neighborhood of Charleston, Fifteen Church is a family home - 3 generations and counting. The house offers historic, comfortable rooms with luxurious yet understated furnishings and fixtures. Pride is taken in staying true to the history of the house and curating it with pieces reflecting local artists, classicism, and home-like warmth.  

While quite a few B&Bs in Charleston boast elegant living spaces, peaceful side porches, home-cooked breakfasts, evening happy hours, and free parking, Fifteen Church also offers rare and invaluable personable experiences with life-long Charlestonian, Jack Simmons, and his wife, Annelise. Annelise grew up in Richmond, VA, but came to Charleston over 40 years ago. They have four children (Suzannah, Warren, Chilton, and Latane) who grew up in the house and now live in Washington, DC; Atlanta, GA; Memphis, TN; and Austin, TX.

Fifteen Church is a place where the owners are happy to sit with you and tell you how their home literally brought them together. (Jack & Annelise met when she moved into the carriage house, and Jack was living on the ground floor.) Their first years of marriage were spent on the ground floor when it was a separate apartment.

History of the House

***MOST INNKEEPERS PROVIDE A ROOM; WE PROVIDE AN EXPERIENCE:***  The Phillips-Yates-Snowden House c. 1842 at 15 Church Street Charleston, SC 29401.  Now the home of Dr. & Mrs. Jack W. Simmons, Jr., the property was originally owned by Captain Timothy Phillips during the Revolution.  The Yates family constructed the present house in the early 1840’s and it served as a hospital during the Civil War during which time it was struck by four cannonballs, two of which are now mounted on the gate posts. It is notable for its Adam style paneling by Thomas Pinckney and ironwork by Charleston iron-wright, Philip Simmons, his most recent addition (1998) being the basement gate at the front.  The Earthquake of 1886 leveled the 4th story, which was rebuilt with a Mansard roof.  Subsequent to this, the structure was reinforced with "earthquake rods", bolts running through the house between the exterior walls. Almost 100 years later, in bringing the structure up to code, this same technology was used with the addition of nine more bolts. 

 
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